Your miniature horse should be dewormed often to remove internal parasites. Equine paste dewormers come in many different shapes and sizes. The brand of dewormer you use will depend on your location and the time of year, because different types of dewormer will kill different parasites.
You can buy dewormers from tack and feed stores or from your veterinarian. You should worm your horse every 6 – 8 weeks. Consult with your veterinarian to design a proper deworming schedule for your horses.
Signs that a horse is infested with worms are coughing, rolling, weight loss, tail rubbing, lethargy, dull coat, and diarrhea.
Products containing Ivermectin, Fenbendazole, and Pyrantel Pamoate are all safe to use with miniature horses. Most brands of dewormer can be used in  pregnant and lactating mares, and foals, but always read the package to make sure.
Dewormers containing Moxidectrin, used in the product Quest, should never be used in miniature horses. If Moxidectrin is over dosed just slightly it can be fatal to miniature horses.

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First, turn the dial ring to the weight of your horse to select the correct dosage.

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Once the dial is locked in the correct position, remove the cap from the tip of the dewormer nozzle.

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Ensure that your horse’s mouth is free of any food. Then insert the dewormer nozzle into the horse’s mouth through the gap in its teeth where the bit would go. Make sure the tube is on top of the horse’s tongue and aimed towards the back of the mouth.

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Once it is in the correct position in the horse’s mouth, push the plunger all the way until it is stopped by the dial. Once all the paste has been extinguished remove the tube from the horse’s mouth.

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Immediately after you’ve finished deworming your horse hold up its head for 10-15 seconds to ensure that the horse swallows all the paste. If you allow them to lower their head immediately after being dewormed they could spit out all the dewormer.
The dewormer may take a while to remove all the parasites, so don’t be alarmed if symptoms continue for a few days.

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